Seasons and Episodes

Watch TV Shows, Movie and Sports Online Free Stream


    Free to Watch The Real L Word Season 3 Episode 3 Love Lost

    Share
    avatar
    kikkoman

    Posts : 52
    Join date : 2012-07-23

    Free to Watch The Real L Word Season 3 Episode 3 Love Lost

    Post  kikkoman on Thu Jul 26, 2012 10:05 pm

    Watch The Real L Word Season 3 Episode 3 Online, Watch The Real L Word S03 E03 Free Stream, The Real L Word Season 3 Episode 3 "Love Lost" Online HD Free Stream, Watch The Real L Word S3xE3 Love Lost HD, The Real L Word Season 3 Episode 3 Love Lost

    The Real L Word is an American reality television series aired on the cable station Showtime, where it premiered on June 20, 2010. The show was created by executive producer Ilene Chaiken and Magical Elves Productions, following the success of the television drama The L Word. The Real L Word follows a group of lesbians in their daily lives in Los Angeles, and as of the third season, Brooklyn.

    Click here to watch

    Previously on The Real L Word "Leap of Faith", Whitney heads north to San Francisco but fails to leave her girl troubles behind; Romi faces the challenge of her new sobriety while still wrestling with her and Kelsey's sexual issues; Sajdah's relationship with Chanel proceeds rapidly; Kacy and Cori find a sperm donor online; Francine counts the days until Claire moves out - and so does Claire, who is eager to leave.

    Click here to watch

    The Real L Word is an American reality television series aired on the cable station Showtime, where it premiered on June 20, 2010. The show was created by executive producer Ilene Chaiken and Magical Elves Productions, following the success of the television drama The L Word. The Real L Word follows a group of lesbians in their daily lives in Los Angeles, and as of the third season, Brooklyn.

    The old joke surfaces early on “The Real L Word.” ”What does a lesbian bring on a second date?” The punch line: “A U-Haul.” “The L Word,” which has inspired this new series, spent its five-year tenure on Showtime tirelessly working to upend the perceptions that underlie such bons mots: that lesbians mate like penguins, for life, with comparatively less vigorous libidos and healthier bean dishes.

    Created in part by Ilene Chaiken, who is also behind the current reality-show successor, “The L Word” juiced itself up on plotlines of near lunacy, portraying the modern lesbian as if she were an organization man of the 1950s, all roving eye and seven-year itch. There was so much sex and intrigue — so many tank tops, stiff drinks, high heels, lost nights, sleek restaurants — that you began to wonder whether the whole shebang was really just a cover-up meant to mask the grim possibility that the actual lives of young, good-looking Los Angeles lesbians were just as monotonous as everyone else’s.

    “The Real L Word” (beginning Sunday on Showtime) gives that theory more credence than you would wish. Forfeiting the “Sex and the City” model adopted by its predecessor, a focus on a group of friends, “The Real L Word” presents the lives of six gay women in Los Angeles who are mostly disconnected from one another. It is an approach that automatically diminishes the dramatic potential, leaving us with women who talk a lot about their “A game,” moving up and working hard for 12 and 14 hours a day. Two of them, Jill and Nikki, are preparing to marry, and they pass between them a rock apparently on loan from a Jackie Collins novel.

    Which one will wear Dolce & Gabbana at the wedding? This is a question of some concern, and one oddly more compelling than any raised by the circumstances of another cast member, Whitney, whose life looks like a tedious round of picking up whiny women at airports. One of the girlfriends in her life is named Sara, but Whitney gratingly adds nonexistent consonants, referring to her as if she were summoning her to Latin American trench warfare: “Saarragh!”

    Whitney makes prosthetics for movies with titles like “Voodoo Cowboy.” And she is not alone among the women on “The Real L Word,” who are involved in show business or fashion, professions whose ubiquity on reality television has stripped them of the glamour or fascination they might have had during the high days of the old economy. Virtually nothing can induce boredom at this point more than a close-up of someone talking about the rigorous demands of her job in public relations. Here that role is consigned to a blond, tattooed motorcyclist, Mikey, who promotes designers and produces fashion shows and dates a voluptuous makeup artist named Raquel.

    Nothing in Mikey’s current life seems as remotely gripping as her own history, which we learn about only fleetingly. Having grown up in the projects of Culver City, Calif., Mikey, as a 9-year old, saw her best friend shot and killed. Too often “The Real L Word” feels like sitting in a restaurant and hearing about some incredible specials that happen to be sold out. Anything genuinely interesting seems to have already taken place.

    If you are wondering, for instance, how Tracy’s girlfriend wound up with joint custody of three children, or how they came to be named Jagger, Dautry and Nikos, “The Real L Word” isn’t inclined to tell you. For all of its nonsense, the fake “L Word” never seemed this stingy.

      Current date/time is Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:21 am